Rooma f xxx

Posted by / 25-Mar-2016 03:28

Rooma f xxx

It w then^fon^ apt to throw li^^ht, more dirrn'tly than ita soooeiior, II many ob Hi'inv words and pa Hsa^es in the Bilde; neverthelees, the material for Biblical xe^enirt (U*poxitoth the eastern and tho western dialects.' Owing to the close Miental exchangi' between the Palestinimi and the Babylonian Jews, these dialects are often found inextricably inti»rwoven, and cannot be distmginshed lexicographically. AM) rili: Ml IHi ASIIMJ MTiii JATUin: OOHPILBD DY MARCrs JASTKOW. It is for this reason, if for no other, that the Jewish literature of post-Biblical days down to the ninth century may be called original. Foreign influences came to Jewish hterature merely through the ordinary channel of international intercourse. Happily there were, in most cases, parallels to be drawn upon for the establishment of a correct text, and where these auxiliaries failed, the author preferred erring on the conservative side to indulging in conjectural emendations.

Starting from such premises, the investigator had to overhaul the laws regulating the derivation of words whose etymology or meaning is unknown from known Semitic roots; every word of strange appearance had to be examined on its merits both as to its meaning or meanings and as to its origin; the temptation offered l)y phonetic resemblances had to be resisted, and the laws of word-formation common to all other original languages as well as the environment in which a word appears had to be consulted before a conclusion could be reached. ^t2^''0 and its dialectic equivalent J Mime stem in the Aramaic, MOn RK.

Hence it is natural to expect that, in extending the horizon of thought, it also extended its vocabulary on its own basis, employing the elements contained in its own treasury.

Kelipon and ethics, exegesis and homiletics, jurisprudence and ceremonial laws, ritual and liturgy, pliilosophy and science, medicine and magics, astronomy md astrology, history and geography, commerce and trade, politics and social lroblems, all are represented there, and reflect the mental condition of the Jewish world in its seclusion fix)m the outer world, as well as in its contact with the same whether in agreement or in opposition.

The subjects of this literature are as unlimited as are the interests of the human mind. N.=: Beth Nathan (quoted in Rab- binowicz Varise Lectiones).

Archaeological matters have often been elucidated by references to Greek and Roman customs and beliefs.

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